War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1068 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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must needs depend greatly upon each other for support and encouragement, it is not unreasonable to conclude that each would have been made to feel with far more intensity and bitterness the just consequences of their atrocious treason. Moreover, shut out from all communion with those to whom they were bound by ties of kindred and friendship, they must have been far sooner discouraged in the vain but desperate struggle in which they have engaged.

On the other hand, it is to be presumed that the enemy, whether openly in arms or secretly plotting against the Government, must have been constantly infused with a new hope and courage through the medium of those facilities for intercommunication which have been afforded by our authorities.

That the interchange which has been so long pursued has at last culminated in the open, defiant, and systematic proceeding which has been commented upon serves to indicate most pointedly that for the future the disallowance altogether of the privilege of correspondence through our lines with parties in the territory of the enemy would be a most desirable measure.

But whether or not this view may approve itself to the Secretary of War, the course to be adopted for the suppression of the illicit publications which have been herein reviewed would seem to be most clear. It is recommended, therefore, that the proprietors of those newspapers in our Northern cities in which these publications have appeared be formally notified by the Government that the same must be at once wholly discontinued by them, and in case o-compliance with this requirement it is advised that they be brought to trial before a military commission for a violation of the laws of war.

J. HOLT,

Judge-Advocate-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., January 22, 1865.

GEORGE H. BOKER, Esq.,

Secretary of Union League, Philadelphia, Pa.:

Your proposition on the part of the Union League to raise one full, new regiment of infantry, to be commanded by veteran officers whom the Governor will commission, the men, if mustered in, to be credited on the present call, is accepted. Please commence at once. Formal authority by mail to-morrow. Are there not a thousand men in Philadelphia who are willing each to put in a representative recruit in accordance with Circular 25, of June last, from this office, and thus form another and crack regiment to represent specially the city and the gentlemen who furnish the men?

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, January 23, 1865.

Honorable SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker of the House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to the resolution of the House of Representatives, dated the 20th instant, in relation to 100-days" men accepted from