War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1063 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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STATE OF IOWA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Davenport, January 21, 1865.

General J. B. FRY,

Washington, D. C.:

Settlement with Major Dodge goes on satisfactorily. After counting all credits allowed by your department of three years" excesses and recent enlistments, this States will he over 16,000 in advance of July and December calls, leaving but few if any delinquent sub-districts. Under the circumstances there ought to be no draft in this State, and I respectfully ask that you say to me now that there will be none. Please reply immediately.

W. M. STONE.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., January 21, 1865.

Governor WILLIAM M. STONE,

Davenport, Iowa:

The excess of credit due to Iowa from former calls will relieve her from obligation to furnish men under the call of December 19. It is hoped, however, that she will complete the new regiment of infantry authorized. Major Dodge's telegram was answered to-day.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S BUREAU,

Washington, D. C., January 22, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: The proposition of His Excellency Governor Fenton is that one man when put in for three years under the present call shall count as three men in filling quotas.

The objections to this are:

First. The exigencies of the service require that 300,000 men shall be immediately put into the field, and the call has therefore been made for that number of men. Three hundred thousand one-year's men will fill the call, and, it is presumed, meet the wants of the service, while 100,000 three-years" men, to be put in as the Governor proposes, will not accomplish it, and in order to obtain 300,000 men the call would necessarily be increased in the same ratio, as the number of years of service furnished exceeds the number of men. It is proposed to furnish all three-years" men, and each man to count as three units in filling the quota. Then, in order to obtain 300,000 men the call would necessarily be for 900,000, or nearly double the largest number yet called for at one time, and the quotas, which are deemed excessive under a call for 300,000, would be thus largely increased. As the men are wanted immediately, it would not be well to consider the present call as filled by 100,000 men (even if enlisted for three years) and then in a few weeks made another call for men needed now.

Second. It is impossible to determine in advance what number of one, two, and three-years" men, respectively, that each locality would actually furnish under the present call, and hence there is no basis upon which quotas to obtain a given number of men, say 300,000, can be assigned other than the one which has been adopted, namely, that