War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1018 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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4th Heavy Artillery, at Columbus................... 963

8th Heavy Artillery, at Paducah.................... 1,305

12th Heavy Artillery, at Munfordville.............. 1,543

13th Heavy Artillery, at Smithland................. 185

72nd Infantry, at Louisa and Covington.............. 80

114th Infantry, at Louisa.......................... 1,000

119th Infantry, at Camp Nelson..................... 27

120th Infantry, at Henderson....................... 226

121st Infantry, at Maysville....................... 185

122nd Infantry, at Louisville........................ 980

123rd Infantry, at Louisville (second class)........ 980

124th Infantry, at Camp Nelson (second class)...... 503

125th Infantry, at Louisville...................... 9

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Total enlisted men................................. 9,623

The One hundred and fourteenth Regiment, at Louisa, is under orders for the Army of the James. It was retained by Major- General Burbridge in consequence of the threatened invasion of the State by Breckinridge. The One hundred and twenty-second has just been completed, and I have directed its concentration at Louisville in order to relieve the One hundred and fourteenth, that it may obey its previous orders. The regiment will descend the Big Sandy, take steam-boat to Parkersburg, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Baltimore. Recruiting continues dull. Most of the able-bodied negroes in the cities and large towns, and the country adjacent thereto, have been enlisted, but we require mounted troops to penetrate the interior counties, which abound with Southern sympathizers, and who adopt every means possible to prevent the negroes from proceeding to the camps of reception. When General Burbridge returns from his expedition the mounted colored force with him can be used for this purpose. The incomplete regiments will then soon be filled. I do not propose to organize any additional regiments in Kentucky, but take the recruits to keep up the standard of those already organized.

I request permission to send recruiting officers to Cairo and Mound City to enlist Kentucky negroes who have escaped from bondage. I understand nearly 1,000 such negroes could be enlisted with their consent. They have not been enrolled in Illinois, but the States could receive credit for them on their quota when enlisted. The major of the regiment at Paducah recruited some 350 of these men, but the assistant adjutant-general at the headquarters in Illinois forbade them being taken from the State, and they were in consequence lost to the service. Form this source I could keep the heavy artillery regiments at Columbus ad Paducah entirely full.

I found it necessary to order shelter for the helpless women and children at Camp Nelson, where there is quite a number, and that number constantly increasing. On Christmas day a large number arrived, stating they were driven from their homes, and in some instances they stated their masters had their cabins pulled down over their heads. I have no reason to suppose that the thorough Union men treat their helpless slaves with any inhumanity, but it is the Southern sympathizers, who are opposed to the policy of arming the blacks. Such of them as have lost their able-bodied men are anxious to get rid of those who are an expense to them, and in many cases drive them off to seek shelter where they best can. I feel bound to take charge of all such, and afford them food and shelter until other provision can be made for them. I learn that a number of women can be profitably employed at Camp Nelson.

I shall go from this place to Nashville, where my presence is necessary. Governor Johnson also wishes to see me.