War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0971 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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examining board established by the War Department and will receive appointment to such grades as the War Department may determine.

3. As soon as the letters of appointment are given, officers may be detailed to secure the enlistment of a certain number of veterans, their commissions, with rank and pay from date of acceptance of appointment, being given when the men are secured. It should be understood that the enlistments are to be consummated here, and an officer can do no more than to sue his influence in persuading the men to come here and enlist.

Officers awaiting action on their papers can occupy the time in this way and collect parties and send them on, securing a statement (as to the number) from the provost-marshal. The proper credit will in all cases be given such officers. The actual and necessary expenses of such officers will be refunded to them.

By order of Major-General Hancock:

FINLEY ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., December 3, 1864.

His Excellency J. A. GILMORE,

Governor of New Hampshire, Concord, N. H.:

DEAR SIR: Your confidential letter of the 1st instant, asking whether there will be another call for troops, is received.

The question is one I am unable to answer. It rests with the President and Secretary of War, and I don"t yet know their views on the subject. In fact, I don"t know that they have any fixed plan about it. My own desire is to see recruiting going on all the time, and I do not hesitate to advise you to raises men now to meet future demands. It will be wise and will, in my judgment, prove of advantage to the Government and to your people.

Wishing you success if you undertake it, I am, very truly and respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, December 5, 1864.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: The experience of the war has shown that breech-loading arms are greatly superior to muzzle-loaders for infantry as well as for cavalry, and that measures should immediately be taken to substitute a suitable breech-loading musket in place of the rifle musket which is now manufactured at the National Armory and by private contractors for this department. It is important that the best arm which is now made shall be adopted and that all breech- loaders thereafter made by or for this department shall conform strictly to it, and that no change shall be made until it shall have been clearly demonstrated that the change is a decided and important improvement. With a view, therefore to carry out these measures, I have the honor to request that a board, to be composed of ordnance, cavalry, and infantry officers, be constituted to meet at Springfield Armory, and at such other place or places as the president or senior officer of the Board may direct, to