War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0953 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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Foreign freight cars impressed for the use of U. S. Military Railroads from February 1 to June 30, 1864:

From Louisville and Nashville Railroad..................... 120

From Louisville and Lexington Railroad.................... 15

From Kentucky Central Railroad............................. 60

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Total...................................................... 195

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Total freight cars to June 30..............................1,647

In addition to supplies troops were forwarded from Nashville by railroad as follows:

February................................................. 17,441

March.................................................... 16,490

April.................................................... 18,737

May...................................................... 32,051

June..................................................... 18,333

Besides the opening of new lines it was necessary to expend an immense amount of labor upon those already in use to render them capable of doing the heavy work thrown upon them. The main line between Nashville and Chattanooga had been constructed originally to accommodate a very limited business and was nearly worn out in the service of the company, who had been its former owners, and of the rebel Government. It was necessary to rebuild while worked to its utmost capacity in transporting supplies, to add new sidings and water stations, and to reconstruct and enlarge old ones. The old and worn-out bridges and dangerous trestles were replaced by permanent, safe structures, and the general capacity of the road was more than doubled ina few months.

Great embarrassment and often serious delays occurred from lack of proper telegraph facilities, resulting from the exclusive control of the military telegraph by another department. Its managers did what was in their power to correct the evils, but it was impossible at times to avoid the inevitable consequences of want of direct responsibility on the part of operators. The telegraph is to a railroad what the nerves are to a human body, and the condition of a person whose nerves are controlled by the will of another may be readily imagined.

Where nine-tenths of the work done by the telegraph is railroad business, and often its promptness and correctness are of vital consequence, it would seem proper for the railroad managers to control the men whose services are so important to them.

On most civil railroads, telegraph operators are part of the organization as much as conductors or engineers, and they are not less necessary to military roads.

In conclusion, I take pleasure in testifying to the skill and energy invariably exhibited by A. Anderson, general superintendent, and W. W. Wright, chief engineer, Military Division of the Mississippi; E. L. Wentz, chief engineer and general superintendent U. S. military railroads of Virginia, and W. H. Whiton, in charge of the office, Washington, D. C.

To these gentlemen and others who might be named I am indebted for hearty co-operation and support at times when difficulties in the way seemed almost insurmountable.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. McCALLUM,

Bvt. Brigadier General, Director and General Manager Mil. R. R. U. S