War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0925 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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it can, the necessity for calling out the militia of the States, or volunteers for short terms, would probably be avoided.

I would also recommended that the call be made at an early day, so that recruiting may commence. It would seem that the rebel authorities are using every effort to enforce their conscription, and the indications are that they will call into service a large number of colored troops.

I inclose the form of proclamation announcing that these calls will be made, and also form of proclamation for the first, which would, in my judgment, be appropriate if the plan proposed should meet with your approval.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

No approved by the Secretary of War.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

DAVENPORT, November 11, 1864.

Brigadier General J. B. FRY:

Governor Yates refuses to rafity the agreements as to credits made by Colonel Loomis, his aide-de-camp. I therefore withdraw all agreements for credits of Illinois men in Iowa regiments.

N. B. BAKER.

WASHINGTON, D. C., November 12, 1864.

Major W. R. PRICE,

Acting Inspector, Cavalry Bureau, Nashville, tenn.:

Consolidation of the Second and Fifth Kentucky Cavalry approved. The Secretary of War authorizes enlistment of loyal Alabamians in the First Alabama Cavalry, but without bounties.

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., November 15, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Bureau of the Provost-Marshal-General of the United States, including the Volunteer Recruiting Service and the Veteran Reserve Corps, since November 1, 1863, the date to which my last annual report was brought up:

The general plan for conducting the busined, as laid down in the regulations approved by you on the 21st of April, 1863, is still observed. The acts of Congress approved February 24, July 1, and July 4, 1864, and experience gained during the past year, have suggested certain modifications in the details, which have been made and put in force.