War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0886 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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shivering with ague, lying upon his camp cot, with his ear near the instrument, listening for the messages which might direct or arrest the movements of mighty armies. Night and day they are at their posts. Their duties constantly place them in exposed positions, and they are favorite objects of rebel surprise.

It is much to be desired that some mode of recognizing and rewarding the bold, faithful, and most important services of these gentlemen should be provided. Their position and duties give them the earliest information of the most important and confidential secrets and orders, and the instances of infidelity have been very rare.

CLOTHING, CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE.

The clothing and the greater part of the camp and garrison equipage of the Army are provided by contract, by purchase, and by manufacture, at the several principal depots, which during the fiscal year, have been as follows:

New York depot, under charge of Lieutenant Colonel D. H. Vinto, deputy quartermaster-general.

Philadelphia depot, under charge of Colonel G. H. Crosman, assistant quartermaster-general.

Cincinnati depot, under charge of Colonel Thomas Swords, assistant quartermaster-general.

Saint Louis depot, under charge of Colonel William Myers, quartermaster and aide-de-camp.

There are several branch depots at which clothing is made up, the materials being supplied from the principal depots. These are at Alton, Ill., and Steubenville, Ohio.

The supply of clothing and equipage has been ample and the quality excellent. Very few complaints are now received from the Army of detective material or workmanship.

Some instances of infidelity in inspectors and of fraud on the part of dealers have been charged, and the accused partied are now undergoing investigation before proper tribunals, which will doubtless ascertain and punish the quilt. To the perseverance and ability of Colonel W. S. Olcutt, special commissioner, the merit of the success of this investigation is due.

Of the principal articles of clothing and equipage these depots have supplied during the fiscal year the following quantities:

Uniform coats..................... 218,288

Uniform jackets................... 635,655

Uniform trousers.................. 3,067,271

Drawers........................... 4,761,540

Shirts, flannel................... 4,743,603

Greatcoats........................ 1,485,593

Blankets:

Woolen............................ 1,890,772

Water-proof....................... 1,421,433

Blouses........................... 2,099,684

Shoes.............pairs........... 2,736,510

Boots..............do............. 1,028,291

Stockings..........do............. 6,838,609

Hats.............................. 1,068,849

Caps.............................. 1,124,773

Knapsacks......................... 760,609

Haversacks........................ 2,045,554

Canteens.......................... 1,845, 188

Hospital tents.................... 9,698

Wall tents........................ 33,164

Wedge or common tents............. 136,442

Shelter tents..................... 801,996

Bed sacks......................... 220,429

Regimental colors................. 927

Camp colors....................... 2,222

National colors................... 771

Flags............................. 5,613

Guidons........................... 5,831

Picks............................. 63,050

Axes.............................. 166,320

Spades and shovels................ 81,589

Hatchets.......................... 71,456

Mess pans......................... 325,216

Camp kettles...................... 207,154

Bugles............................ 9,018

Trumpets.......................... 7,006

Drums............................. 13,451

Fifes............................. 14,830