War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0859 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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stration upon Mount Sterling, the terminus of my line in that part of the State.

After stubborn resistance the town was finally occupied by the enemy, and the country to the westward through which my line ran, to a point within eleven miles of the city of Lexington. While held by the enemy serious damage was done my line. The operator at Mount Sterling, Mr. J. W. Curtiss, remained at his post until the evacuation of the place by the Union forces, and then only saved himself by flight, carrying with him his instrument, dispatches, &c. For six days he lay concealed, and finally stole through the enemy's lines, reaching Lexington in safety, without the loss of anything valuable connected with his office. His conduct under such trying circumstances was exemplary and received my approbation. The enemy were in a few days defeated, first in the streets of Lexington and afterward at Cynthiana, their organization broken up, and the entire force scattered and put to flight. No sooner had the enemy disappeared than prompt repairs were given the line and the office at Mount Sterling reopened. To aid in the repulse of the enemy in this important move, Colonel Weatherford's command the Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry, was called in from Burkesville. A portion of the command was held at Green River bridge, about forty miles from Burkesville, and the operators on duty at Burkesville and Columbia were ordered in to that point, thus for the time closing those two offices and abandoning the line south of Green River bridge; but no sooner were thhe Union forces again occupied Burkesville, and the line was repaired and the abandoned offices reopened as before.

It was found that but little damage had been done this line, thus temporarily abandoned, and the work of putting it again in order was but light. After the defeat of the enemy at Cynthiana small parties of his forces were traversing the State in all directions, stealing, marauding, and working destruction wherever they went.

Whenever they came in contact with my lines only slight damage was done, and the interruptions thereby occasioned existed but a few hours. Such was the case between Camp Nelson and Nicholasville, between Stanford and crab Orchard, and between Danville and Lebanon.

The following tabular statements are respectfully submitted:

Lines constructed January 1 to June 30, 1864.

Miles.

January: Six miles beyond Camp. Burnside, Ky.,

to Jacksonborough, Tenn................................. 65

February: Jacksborough, Tenn.,

to Clinton, Tenn........................................ 36

March: Columbia, Ky., to

Burkesville, Ky......................................... 30

April:

Danville, Ky., to Stanford, Ky.......................... 11

Cumberland Gap, Ky.,

to Fincastle, Tenn...................................... 30

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Total...................................................172

Lines abandoned January 1 to June 30, 1864.

January: Miles.

Tazeswell, Tenn., to Powell's River

bridge, Tenn............................................. 7

Knoxville, Tenn., to Strawberry Plains, Tenn.............. 22

Loundon, Tenn., to Kingston, Tenn........................ 25

February:

Camp Burnside, Ky., to Clinto, Tenn......................100

Powell's River bridge, Tenn., to

Cumberland Gap, Ky....................................... 5

Knoxville, Tenn., to Charleston, Tenn.................... 70

March: Columbia, Ky., to Jamestown, Ky................... 18