War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0754 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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In reply I beg leave to say that under the law the case made by the memorialist does not entitle the citizens of Monona County to exemption. The persons who are exempt from liability to draft are specifically named in the enrollment act and its amendments, and "none others are exempt."

The question as to what organization or particular duty these persons will be assigned after they have entered the military service is one for the consideration of the commander-in-chief.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 266.

Washington, October 4, 1864.

The allowance for clothing for each year to each soldier of the Regular Army during his enlistment of three years will be the exact proportion laid down for each of the first three years in General Orders, Numbers 220, War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, July 1, 1864, and not the ratio of one-fifth the full five-year allowance.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

October 4, 1864 - 9.25 a. m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Commanding Northern Department, Columbus, Ohio:

Brevet Major-General Hovey telegraphs the following from Indianapolis at 9.50 p. m. the 2nd instant:

Have just received a telegram informing me of an outbreak in Orange and Crawford Counties, two of the most inaccessible portions of the State. Shall need horses to suppress it. Can I use the Government horses now here in the hands of the quartermaster? We must have some cavalry to enforce the draft. There is said to be about 500 men in Brownstown, Crawford County, robbing and resisting the draft.

The Secretary of War has directed that the above be sent you, and that you go at once to Indianapolis and give proper orders. General Hovey has been told to report to you for his orders in the case. Acknowledge receipt.

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, October 4, 1864.

Brigadier-General FRY:

Desertions by drafted men are so numerous, and dissatisfaction so general among those who have to take the places of deserters, it is important politically that when a deserter is arrested, examined, and accepted, one man who has been compelled to take the place of a deserter should be released. The man to be released to be designated by the person arresting the deserter. Copperheads desert and Union men take their places.

J. G. JONES,

Colonel and Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.