War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0747 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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UNION STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE ROOMS,

Numbers 1105 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, September 27, 1864.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington City:

DEAR SIR: Be kind enough to postpone the draft in the First Ward, Philadelphia, for two weeks. It is a loyal locality, and we have entire confidence that the quota will be filled by that time. If our conjecture is correct, that the quota will be filled by volunteers, the men will be had sooner than by draft. Grant the request.

Yours, respectfully,

B. RUSH PETRIKIN.

For SIMON CAMERON,

Chairman State Central Committee.

OFFICE NORTH AMERICAN AND U. S. GAZETTE,

Numbers 132 South Third Street, Philadelphia, September 27, 1864.

Brigadier General J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

DEAR SIR: There are may reasons why the draft in the First Ward of this city should be temporarily postponed. It is believed by well-informed persons that if a delay of two weeks can be granted the number necessary to fill the quota can be obtained by volunteering, and I earnestly recommend that the delay should be allowed.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

M. MCMICHAEL.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., September 28, 1864.

Honorable SCHUYLER COLFAX,

South Bend, Ind.:

DEAR SIR: Your telegram of the 26th instant to the President saying that my decision that "drafted men skedaddling must be made up from Unionists who don"t run is terrible," has been shown to me. The decision is one of law, announced by Judge Holt last year.

It don"t say that the place of skedaddlers must necessarily be filled by Unionists, and I hope that is not always the case. A copy of a letter from me to Governor Parker, dated August 11, and the opinion of Judge Holt are inclosed.* I am satisfied that the position of the Department on this subject is right, and that any departure from it will result in evil to the cause.

I should be glad to see the people reconciled to it, though I know, like many other things in war, it is a little rough.

With best wishes for your success, I am, truly, yours,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., September 28, 1864.

Major J. W. T. GARDINER,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, Augusta, Me.:

Have every possible effort made to arrest promptly drafted men who fail to report as required.

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*See p. 609 ante and Vol. III, this series, p. 784.

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