War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0712 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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the number of polls-voting places-with power to select inspectors and judges, and that they intended to profit by the advantage.

Pardon me for trespassing of ar upon your time, and perhaps upon your patience. My excuse is that we are upon the very verge of civil war in Indiana, and I deem it my duty to keep you fully advised of our condition. To prevent it regard caution will be requisite as well as such a manifestation as will attract attention and be unmistakable of the power and the fixed purpose of the Government to maintain and enforce the law.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES G. JONES,

Colonel and Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

CONCORD, September 12, 1864.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

The Governor of New Hampshire respectfully requests authority to muster out the two companies of State militia now on duty at Fort Constitution, Portsmouth Harbor, at once, in order that the men comprising them may immediately re-enlist in the Tenth Company of Heavy Artillery just authorized. This arrangement will be of advantage both to the General Government and the State. The company authorized will number but ten less than the two now on garrison duty.

This dispatch was drafted by Captain Silvey, and meets his hearty approval.

J. A. GILMORE,

Governor.

CITY POINT, VA., September 13, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I would respectfully recommend that a supervising inspector of the Treasury Department, within the lines of the army, be appointed by the President. The amount of support received by our enemies through either the ignorance or corruption of Treasury agents and post commanders is fearful, and should be stopped in some way. Colonel A. H. Markland, special agent of the Post- Office Department, an officer of the Government thoroughly acquainted with all that has been done in the West from the beginning of the war, I think, would be a good appointment.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., September 13, 1864-10.30 a. m.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

My dispatch to you on the subject of enforcing the draft was suggested by reading Secretary Seward's Auburn speech, where he intimates that volunteers were coming in so rapidly that there would be no necessity for a draft, and your dispatch stating that volunteers were coming in at the rate of 5,000 per day.