War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0604 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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New York City and Brooklyn, appear to be unequal and oppressive, may be adjusted equitably in proportion to the demands made upon other parts of the country.

If there is any wrong in the quotas of New York, the only proper and practicable way to remedy it is to correct the enrollment on which the quotas are assigned. That can only be done by the boards of enrollment, aided by the people.

A commission can be of no service whatever in the matter. This is confirmed by the history of the Commission referred to above, which met in 1863 and which failed to establish any rule or principal useful for the administration of the law. The Commission stated as follows:

Justice to the enrolling officers requires that it should be distinctly stated that their fidelity or integrity is by no means impeached by any inaccuracies that may exist in the enrollment. They were the necessary results of the execution of the law under the circumstances. The Commission were unable to devise any means to correct the enrollment. Whatever might be done in this direction would necessarily be estimates and calculations, and these would be founded upon some assumed date, so that there would be nothing reliable in any result that should be attained. At best, the estimate would be the result of a guess, or proceed upon some assumed arbitrary rule which it might be supposed would equalize the enrollment of the State of New York with that of other States.

The comparisons instituted in the letter of Governor Seymour between the quotas of different districts have not been carried far enough by him to give correct ideas on that subject.

The Governor says the average quotas in the thirty-one Congressional districts of New York are 2,881; in Massachusetts and New Hampshire they are 2,167; in Pennsylvania, 2,571. Carrying the comparison no further, he infers injustice to New York. If carried on the following facts appear: The average quotas in the Congressional districts of New Jersey are 3,178; Indiana, 3,248; Illinois, 4,004; Michigan, 3,047; Wisconsin, 3,172; Missouri, 2,964; the average in each of these States being much larger than in New York. In the New England States the average is much smaller. The average quota per district under the last call throughout the United States is 2,777. The average quota of districts in New York being 2,881, it appears that New York is but 104 per district above the average throughout the United States. The following table shows the quotas assigned to the districts in New York City and Brooklyn under the respective calls of October 17, 1863, and February 1, 1864, and July 18, 1864, based in both cases upon the enrollment:

District.

Second Third Fourth Fifth

Quotas of 500,000 men under the 4,821 4,119 6,409 4,403

call of October 17, 1863, and

February 1, 1864, based on the

enrollment

Quotas of 500,000 men under 4,126 3,574 4,071 3,971

call of July 18, 1864, based on

the enrollment.

Excess of quota under calls of 695 545 2,338 432

October 17, 1863, and February

1, 1864, for 500,000 men, over

call of July 18, 1864, for same

number of men a.

Sixth Seventh Eighth Ninth Total

Quotas of 500,000 men 5,198 4,794 5,125 3,192 38,061

under the call of

October 17, 1863, and

February 1, 1864,

based on the

enrollment

Quotas of 500,000 men 3,485 4,239 4,346 3,028 30,840

under call of July

18, 1864, based on

the enrollment.

Excess of quota under 1,713 555 779 164 7,221

calls of October 17,

1863, and February 1,

1864, for 500,000

men, over call of

July 18, 1864, for

same number of men a.

a This excess results from the fact that the enrollment has been reduced since last year by revision and correction.