War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0602 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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as they show that the interest taken by the population in perfecting the enrollment is greater in some places than in others. It is further said:

I do not mean to find fault with those who made them (the enrollments) in New York and Brooklyn. I know what they state is true; that it is not possible to avoid the enrollment there of persons who are not liable to be drafted because they are aliens or non-residents. Those whose names are thus erroneously put down have no interest in correcting the lists, while the fact that they swell the enrollment brings grievous burdens upon the districts to which they are charged. Since the enrollments were made there has been no opportunity to correct them; neither can this be done now. While names may be added to the lists, those which are improperly placed there cannot be stricken off.

If it is a fact that there are aliens and non-residents on the enrollment lists to a grievous extent, it is fair to assume that the fact of alienage or non-residence is known to somebody in the district, and all that is required (see orders herewith) is, that the fact shall be shown to the Board of Enrollment. It is not necessary that "those whose names are erroneously put down" and "who have no interest in correcting the lists" should appear in the matter. All that is necessary in any case is for any good citizen to show the board the fact as to the alienage nor non- residence of any enrolled man and his name will be immediately stricken off. The orders herewith show this to be so, and show also that the Governor is inaccurate in stating that 'since the enrollments were made no opportunity has been given to correct them."On the contrary, special opportunities have been afforded for this purpose, commencing as long ago as November 17, 1863. (See Circular Numbers 101, herewith.*) The Governor of New York was informed of these opportunities, and has, in one instance at least, recognized them, for on the 27th of May he issued a circular letter, as follows, to wit:

GENERAL HDQRS. STATE OF NEW YORK, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Albany, May 27, 1864.

The following communication from General Fry, Provost-Marshal- General are sent to you for the information of the public:

(Telegram.)

"WASHINGTON, May 19, 1864.

"Brigadier General WILLIAM HAYS,

"Major FREDERICK TOWNSEND, and

"Major A. S. DIVEN,

"Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General:

"Confer with State authorities and endeavor to get the different districts and sub-districts to commence raising men at once, with a view to the new call referred to in dispatch of yesterday from Secretary of War. It will be greatly to the advantage of the different towns, counties, and wards to save time by commencing immediately on assumed quotas. Spare no efforts to achieve the revision of enrollment at earliest possible day. The exact new quotas will be based upon it. I want it reported to me by 10th of June.

"JAMES B. FRY,

"Provost-Marshal-General."

(Telegram.)

"WASHINGTON, May 18, 1864.

"Brigadier General WILLIAM HAYS,

"Major FREDERICK TOWNSEND, and

"Major A. S. DIVEN,

"Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General:

"Let the revision of the enrollment be pushed to completion at the earliest possible day, and make known to the people that it is plainly for the interest of each town, ward, &c., to have stricken from the lists all names improperly enrolled, because an excess of names increases the quota called from such town, ward, &c.

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*Vol. III, this series, p. 1074.

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