War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0559 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 29, 1864.

Governor YATES,

Springfield, Ill.:

No credits have ever yet been given to any State for men whose term of service was less than six months. Illinois is on same footing with regard to 100-days" men as New York, Massachusetts, and other States.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, July 29, 1864.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I desire to raise eleven regiments of one-years's men for the best interests of the State every way.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 29,1 864.

GOVERNOR OF INDIANA,

Indianapolis, Ind.:

SIR: You are hereby authorized to raise eleven new regiments of volunteer infantry under the call of the 18th instant for 500,000 men. The term of service will be either for one, two, or three years, as recruits may elect. The said regiments must be mustered in before September 5, 1864, in order that they may be credited on the quota of the State under the aforesaid call. Incomplete regiments and companies which fail to organize within a reasonable time will be consolidated, so as to form and be mustered in with complete regimental organization before that date. The recruitment, organization, and musters into service will be in conformity with the requirements of the existing regulations of the War Department. Bounties will be paid in accordance with the provisions of Circular Numbers 27, current series, from this office.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

STATE OF INDIANA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Indianapolis, July 29, 1864.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Louisville, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: By direction of the Governor I write to inform you that there are at Jeffersonville, New Alabany, and Evansville a number of agents for substitute brokers from the Eastern States engaged in enticing colored men from Kentucky and Tennessee to go with them to points East to be used as substitutes. It has been complained of and our people think it should be stopped. Squads of five to ten pass through the city on the trains daily, and our police and provost-marshals re doubtful as to their duty in the premises. Your orders