War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0427 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, June 10, 1864.

Adjutant-General COWEN,

Columbus:

If you can furnish me evidence of Mr. Cox's tampering with the regiment he shall be promptly treated as such a crime deserves.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, June 10, 1864-8 p. m.

Governor BROUGH,

Cincinnati, Ohio:

Your telegram of yesterday has remained unanswered in the hourly expectation of receiving some report from General Burbridge concerning the nature and extent of the rebel movement in Kentucky. Nothing has yet been heard from him. His force ought to be much more than a march for anything the rebels can bring against him; but if the rebel force is of any magnitude it has probably Cincinnati and possibly Camp Chase in view. Nothing will be done to divert or weaken the force you have left, nor any effort spared to help you if there should be need. The Chief of Ordnance informs me that he has filled your requisition, and I trust you will not fail to make requisition for anything that we can furnish. In respect to moving the prisoners East, all the forts are full, and it would require more guards to transport them than to keep them where they are. The troubles in Illinois and Indiana forbid the expectation of any aid from those quarters, and the course of Yates does not seem likely to diminish the troubles. The military news is all right. No apparent movement has been made in front of Richmond the last three days, but in three days more something will transpire. Hunter's success has been very important. Nothing recent from Sherman. Let me hear from you.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, June 10, 1864.

Governor BROUGH,

Cincinnati:

Since my telegram of this evening to you I have an unofficial telegram stating that Burbridge had whipped the rebels at Mount Sterling. It occurs to me that three or four light-draft gun- boats to patrol from Louisville to Wheeling would afford Ohio great protection. For this purpose light-draft steam-boats, with one good piece of artillery on the bow, would serve if regular gun-boats cannot be had. I have applied to the Navy for gun- boats, and will let you know to-morrow whether they can be had. They are the best and cheapest protection you can have, and will save many troops in case of a serious rebel raid.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.