War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0395 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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exercise more caution and regard for the public welfare in future he authorizes you to restore to them their respective establishments.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT.

Washington City, May 20, 1864-1 p.m.

Major-General DIX,

New York:

You will please proceed immediately to take the examination of the telegraph operators, superintendents, and officers that may have been arrested by you under order of this Department, taking their statements and examination in writing, and, if satisfied that they have had no complicity nor part in the transmission or perpetration of the forgery of the President's proclamation, published in The World and Journal of Commerce, you will discharge them, but holding in arrest any against whom any evidence may appear and reporting the same.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., May 20, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: The various acts passed between June 1861, and February, 1864, prescribed among other details the number of men which might be called out. The first section of the amendatory enrollment act, approved February 24, 1864, however, says:

That the President of the United States shall be authorized whenever he shall deem it necessary during the present war, to call for such number of men for the military service of the United States as the public exigencies may require.

I understand that under this the President can call for as many men as he deems necessary and prescribe their term of service, and that all such men will be entitled to the various bounties provided in former acts for the number of men specified in such acts.

The bounties authorized at this time by existing laws for volunteers called into service for different periods of time are as follows:

First. Volunteers for three years or the war for old or new regiments are entitled to $100 bounty.

Second. Volunteers for two years for old or new regiments (if discharged honorably after a service of two years or during the war) are entitled to $100 bounty.

Third. Volunteer infantry for nine months are entitled to $25 bounty. Troops called out in accordance with the foregoing may be formed into new organizations without impairing their claim to bounty.

Fourth. For the purpose of filling up the regiments of infantry in the U. S. service, volunteer recruits may be raised for one year. They are entitled to $50 bounty.

I find no law which provides bounty for new organizations raised for one year's service.