War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0386 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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putting in the right ones, there can be no serious difficulty in securing the co-operation of citizens for the purpose of making a correct enrollment.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

Operator will send similar dispatch to following:

Captain William Silvey, Concord, N. H.; Brigadier General T. G. Pitcher, Brattlegorough, Vt.; Major Francis N. Clarke, Boston, Mass.; Captain Wesley Owens, Providence, R. I.; Major D. D. Perkins Hartford, Conn.; Brigadier General W. Hays, New York City; Major Frederick Townsend, Albany, N. Y., Major A. S. Diven, Elmira, N. Y.; Lieutenant Colonel R. C. Buchanan, Trenton, N. J.; Major C. C. Gilbert, Philadelphia, Pa., Lieutenant Colonel J. V. Bomford, Harrisburg, Pa.; Colonel N. L. Jeffries, Baltimore, Md.; Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Darr, jr., Wheeling, W. Va., Major W. H. Sidell, Louisville, Ky.; Colonel E. B. Alexander, Saint Louis, Mo.,; Colonel J. H. Potter, Columbus, Ohio; Colonel Conrad Baker, Indianapolis, Ind.; Lieutenant Colonel James Oakes, Springfield, Ill.; Lieutenant Colonel Bennett H. Hill, Detroit, Mich., Major Thomas Duncan, Davenport, Iowa; Colonel James D. Greene, Madison, Wis., Lieutenant Colonel J. T. Averill, Saint Paul, Minn.; Captain Sidney Clarke, Leavenworth, Kans.

[MAY 18, 1864. - For Brough to Stanton, giving the points to which 34,000 100-days" men have been sent in sixteen days, see Series I, Vol. XXXVII, Part I, p. 491.]

NEW YORK, May 18, 1864

(Received 10 a.m.)

Major THOMAS T. ECKERT:

The following is taken from the New York World of this morning.

Is it genuine?

M. S. ROBERTS,

Manager New York Office.

Four hundred thousand more troops called for.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 17, 1864.

FELLOW-CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES:

In all exigencies it becomes a nation carefully to scrutinize its line of conduct, humbly to approach the Throne of Grace, and meekly to implore forgiveness, wisdom, and guidance.

For reasons known only to Him it has been decreed that this country should be the scene of unparalleded outrage, and this nation the monumental sufferer of the nineteenth century. With a heavy heart, but an undiminished confidence in our cause, I approach the performance of duty, rendered imperative by my sense of weakness before the Almighty, and of justice to the people.

It is not necessary that I should tell you that the first Virginia campaign under Lieutenant-General Grant, in whom I have every confidence, and whose courage and fidelity the people do well to honor is virtually closed.

He has conducted his great enterprise with discreet ability.