War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0279 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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otherwise appropriated, for arming, clothing, subsisting, transporting, and paying volunteers that may be received by the President for any term not less than one hundred days.

Approved May 6, 1864.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR

WAR DEPT., ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 37.

Washington, May 9, 1864.

The following order of January 15, 1864, is republished for the information of all concerned:

Ordered, That where regiments, authorized by the War Department to be organized as veteran volunteers, shall contain veterans to the number of not less than 500, the new recruits already enlisted for such regiments shall on the same footing as recruits enlisting into old regiment in the field; and the new recruits so enlisted, or that may enlist to fill up such regiment, may be paid the same bounty as recruits to old existing regiments, to wit, $300.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 9, 1864.

DEPARTMENT COMMANDERS:

The regiments and batteries of the Regular Army will be excluded from the operation of General Orders, Numbers 91, current series, from this office, which provides for the transfer of enlisted men from the Army to the naval service.

By other of the Secretary of War:

SAMUEL BRECK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

STATE OF MARYLAND, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Annapolis, May 9, 1864.

Colonel JAMES. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

DEAR SIR: The public announcement of the fact that the draft i this State will take place in a few days induces me to address you upon the subject of the proper credit for colored troops mustered into service from this State, and which I feel assured we have not yet received. The rolls of these colored troops, except a few recently received for the purpose of the bounties, have never been returned to this department, so that I have no means of stating officially or with entire accuracy the number of these that we have furnished but from the best information I can obtain I feel satisfied that it will amount to from 7,000 to 8,000 men. Indeed, the number, according to the usual estimate of our citizens, would largely exceed this, but I make all due allowance for these who have been actually lost to the State and their owners but not actually mustered, nor perhaps, technically speaking, a proper credit to our quota. Nevertheless, the fact