War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0229 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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to $90 each and their traveling expenses. Under authority of the War Department, and promised by General Wilson to ride their own horses, the men brought in favorite private horses, and their friends aided them. The present order will not only wrong the soldiers to the pecuniary expense named, but greatly demoralize them. The Ninth and Twelfth Regiment could soon complete their mounting, the officers agreeing to do it within thirty days if permitted to do so.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., April 13, 1864.

Governor MORTON,

Indianapolis:

I do not perceive how it is possible for the men to lose anything by the order referred to. The Government pays them the stipulated price for their horses, and having become Government property the men have no right to control the Government in their use. As to the men becoming demoralized, that is the usual argument for disobedience to orders and cannot prevail against public necessity. I have no fears of troops raised by you becoming demoralized from any such cause. The necessity for every horse and man being in the field without a day's delay is imperative, and of far more consequence than a brigade of horses two or three weeks after time they are wanted. I have perfected confidence in your patriotic zeal and influence overcoming all personal considerations and dissatisfaction in this urgent hour, and that no man would more deeply lament that Indiana cavalry failed to respond to the trumpet-call from any cause, and especially such as are urged against the order made at the special instance of the Commanderin-Chief. Come, id yourself up, and once more to the field, old chief, with every horse and man!

EDWIN M. STANTON.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 162.

Washington, April 14, 1864.

IN RELATION TO THE CAVALRY BUREAU.

I. That the Cavalry Bureau shall be under command of the chief of Army staff, who shall perform the duties of chief of the Cavalry Bureau prescribed by existing orders; and the officers of that Bureau respectively will report to him.

II. All the duties relating to the organization, equipment, and inspection of cavalry will be performed by a cavalry officer specially assigned to that duty.

III. The duties in relation to purchase and inspection of horses, the subsistence and transportation of horses purchased, will be performed by and under the direction of an officer of the Quartermaster's Department, specially assigned to that duty.

IV. Lieutenant-Colonel Ekin is assigned to the quartermaster's duties of the Cavalry Bureau.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.