War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0206 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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intended for immediate service. To one instance I may properly refer. In France, under Napoleon, when intended for immediate service, the battalions were limited to 300 instead of 1,000 men. My experience in this department fully justified this practice where troops are required for instant service. Under other circumstances a departure from the Army regulations would be inexcusable. It is my intention to fill these regiments to the minimum and maximum number as soon as possible, and I hope that this campaign may furnish the material for such purpose.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 123.

Washington, March 28, 1864.

1. Circular Numbers 23, of March 9, in relation to the transfer of enlisted men of the Army to the naval service, is revoked.

2. Every department and army commander will cause to be transferred as speedily as possible to the nearest naval station named in General Orders, Numbers 91, all enlisted men who desire to enlist in the Navy, and who fulfill the conditions required in General Orders, Numbers 91, without regard to the restriction in said orders as to reduction of regiments and companies below the minimum organization, which restriction is removed.

3. Daily reports by telegraphed will be made to the Adjutant- General of the number of men transferred and the station to which they are sent.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, March 28, 1864.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: The Governor of Kentucky is here and desires to have the following points definitely fixed:

First. That the quotas of troops furnished and to be furnished by Kentucky may be adjusted upon the basis as actually reduced by able-bodied men of hers having gone into the rebel service, and that she be required to furnish no more than her just quotas upon fair adjustment on such basis.

Second. That to whatever extent the enlistment and drafting one or both, of colored troops may be found necessary within the State, it may be conducted within the law of Congress, and as far as practicable free from collateral embarrassment, disorders, and provocations. I think these requests of the Governor are reasonable, and I shall be obliged if you will give him a full hearing, and do the best you can to effect these objects.

Yours, very truly,

A. LINCOLN.