War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0190 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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RECAPITULATION.

Rewards to be paid for arrest of deserters:

For arrest and delivery of a deserter..................... $30.00

Total amounts to be paid in cash to recruits as pay and bounty:

Before leaving general rendezvous.......................... $73.00

In continued in service for three years, the pay and bounty received will be at the following rates:

For veteran volunteers, per month.......................... $24.00

For other soldiers, not veterans, per month............... 21.30

If discharged at the end of two years the pay and bounty received will be at the following rates:

For veteran volunteers, per month.......................... $29.70

For other soldiers, not veterans, per month............... 25.50

III. The time for re-enlisting veteran volunteers is not limited, and will continue until further orders. After the 31st of March, 1864, the bounty to soldiers (both veteran and recruits) will be $100 only, as provided by law for two years" service; $25 of this to be in advance, together with one month's pay in advance. This does not refer to local bounties, which are paid by local authorities, according to local arrangements.

IV. The Veteran Reserve Corps re-enlists are provided for volunteers. Detailed instructions ar furnished by the Provost- Marshal-General.

E. D. TOWSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, D. C., March 19, 1864.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

SIR: I commend to your favorable consideration the suggestions contained in the inclosed copy of a letter addressed to me by Lord Lyons on the 17th instant on the subject of the forthcoming draft and in relation to proceedings concerning claims for exemption therefrom on the ground of alienage.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

W. H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.]

WASHINGTON, March 17, 1864.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, &c.:

MY DEAR SIR: An order for a fresh draft appeared in the newspapers yesterday . This leads me to make to you two suggestions with the object-on the one hand of relieving British subjects from unnecessary trouble, expense, and anxiety, and on the other of checking the increase of the official applications from this legation to the State Department, the number of which, notwithstanding all my endeavors to keep it as small as possible, continues to grow larger, and has, I am too well aware, been a serious inconvenience.

My first suggestion is that the boards of enrollment should be so ordered not to subject again to the risk of being drafted, and consequently to the necessity of proving afresh their titles to exemption, aliens whose claims have been admitted on the occasion of previous