War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0185 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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county that may not have furnished its quota, although the State in the aggregate may have furnished its quota and more. Whether this construction will be adhered to and acted upon by the Government I am unable to say. The adjutant-general is preparing for publication as rapidly as possible a statement of the number of men of men furnished by each county from the beginning of the war, including the proper credits for the re-enlisted veterans. The veterans are re-enlisted in the field, and the locality to which they are to be credited is determined by themselves at the time of re-enlistment, and put down upon rolls. The statement cannot, therefore, be completed until these rolls shall have been received. When we consider the great number of troops that have been furnished by the State for the prosecution of the war, the promptness with which they have responded to the calls of the Government, and the great and uniform gallantry they have displayed upon so many bloody fields, we may well be proud of the record which Indiana has made.

Since writing the above Colonel Baker has received the following dispatch:

WASHINGTON, March 15, 1864.

Colonel CONRAD BAKER,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

The President of the United States has made a call for 200,000 men in addition to the call of February 1, 1864, for 500,000. The qouta will be two-fifths of the quota of 500,000, subject to additions for deficiencies and deduction for excesses on that quota. As soon as practicable you will be informed of the number required for each district of your State. Notify the Governor immediately.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

Under this new call the quota of Indiana, according to the ratio adopted under the call of October last, will be 12,665, but according quoted, will be 13,008 men. The excess furnished by the State over former calls is almost double the quota under the last, yet it is not likely that under the operation by the section quoted from the act of February 24, 1864, as construed by the Provost-Marshal-General, the draft may full upon a number of counties that have failed to do their part. As before stated, the liabilities and credits of each county will be given as soon as the necessary data can be procured in the adjutant-general's office, and when that has been done the quota of each county can be approximately distributed among the several townships or wards in cities.

O. P . MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 106.

Washington, March 16, 1864.

UNIFORM SYSTEM OF AMBULANCES.

The following act of Congress is published for the information and guidance of all concerned:

PUBLIC--Numbers 22.

AN ACT to establish a uniform system of ambulances in the armies of the United States.

Be it enacted by the State and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the medical director, or chief medical