War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0057 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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that corps that have the right to re-enlist have re-enlisted except the Seventy-ninth New York, which numbers less than 200 men. These regiments will all be filled in due time. I hope that no misunderstanding will arise to check the work. You may be sure of my disposition to carry out the wishes of the Department.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE FOR RECRUITING COLORED REGTS.,

Numbers 1210 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, January 28, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Having nearly 600 men mustered in for the Twenty-fifth Regiment U. S. Colored Troops, I have the honor to request authority to recruit another regiment.

If the company of the Twenty-fifth which is ordered to Delaware on recruiting service were furnished with arms and got off on that duty, the new regiment, for which I have just asked authority to raise, could be completed in a very short time.

Permit me to renew our request that furloughs be granted to worthy well recommended non-commissioned officers and privates in the Army who seek admittance to our free military academy for the purpose of making themselves competent to command colored troops. I hope you will cause a review of the opinion which has determined that furloughs for such a purpose is inconsistent with the good of the service.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

THOMAS WEBSTER,

Chairman.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., January 30, 1864.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to recommend that the total quota of the draft under the enrollment act be fixed at 500,000, and that this entire first draft quota be now apportioned among the different localities in accordance with the opinion of Honorable William Whiting, Solicitor of the War Department, as contained in Circular Numbers 3, of January 7, 1864, from this office, and that these quotas be immediately communicated to all concerned. I would further recommend that the 10th of March next be fixed as the time for commencing the draft for these quotas in all localities where they are not furnished by the 1st of March.

You will observe that the President's call for men, dated October 17, 1863, was for 300,000. The foregoing proposition to make the total quota for draft 500,000 is virtually making an additional call for 200,000 men, less the number obtained by the late draft. I think it is best to make such an additional call, and to make it at this time. I assume that the Government will want the men. The disposition to engage in the war is at this time better, in my opinion, than it has been at any time since the first year of the rebellion. States, counties, and towns are now actively engaged in raising troops, and will, I think, be willing to bear the additional burthen.