War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0042 CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, No. 11.

Hilton Head, S. C., January 21, 1864.

With a view to the enforcement of an equitable and just draft for the military service a complete census of all males between the ages of eighteen and forty-five not in the military or naval service of the United States will be at once made in this department. Post commanders are charged with the execution of this order within the limits of their respective commands. Copies of the rolls will be forwarded by them to these headquarters. These rolls must contain the name, age, color, and occupation and length of residence in the department of each individual. All permits to leave the department must bear date subsequent to this order.

By command of Major General Q. A. Gillmore:

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR

WAR DEPT., ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 9.

Washington, January 22, 1864.

The following instructions from the Secretary of War are furnished for the information and guidance of all concerned:

Officers signing the discharge papers of enlisted men who are discharged on surgeon's certificate of disability will note on the

back of the discharge, where the conduct of the man has not been meritorious, as required by General Orders, No. 212, of 1863, for admission into the Invalid Corps, that he is not a proper person for the Invalid Corps.

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., January 22, 1864.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

There is no objection to removing trade restrictions in all Kentucky east of the Tennessee River. I would advise no change in Tennessee until Longstreet is driven out. If Sherman's expedition proves successful, I would then see no objection to the removal of restrictions in the whole State and in West Kentucky.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 22, 1864.

Brigadier General JOHN L. HONDSDON,

Adjutant-General of Maine, Augusta, Me. L

GENERAL: Yours of the 16th instant is received. I think you have misunderstood my letter of the 13th instant. Please refer to it. You state that "justice to Governor Coburn (now in private life) requires me to say that he did not regard the critical period of the Union in this war as being so certainly passed as to warrant," &c.

Permit me to say that I certainly had no intention of doing Governor Coburn injustice, nor do I find anything in my letter which seems to me calculated to do it. I said nothing as to his opinions of the critical period of the Union, nor of my own on the same subject. You further state, referring to me, "Your (my) position that every town should raise its own quota of men was clearly intended to be understood