War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0009 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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was no fixed system in calling out troops. As circumstances demanded, requisitions were made upon the Governors. In many cases troops were tendered by the Governors, and accepted by the United States, without calls being made.

Authorizations to individuals and independent acceptances were given, and many troops were brought into service in this way without said authorization passing through the State authorities.

This system of independent organizations terminated by General Orders, No. 18, of 1862, from this office.

As result of this want of a general system in the calling out of troops during the first year of the war, it was found necessary, before fixing the quotas under the calls of 1862, to determine the quotas of the respective States for 1861.

This was done by considering the number of men the States had in the field. This number, from the States that were to have additional quotas assigned, was 548, 184, the quota of which for Iowa was 19,316.

THOMAS M. VINCENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, January 6, 1864.

SUPTS. OF VOLUNTEER RECRUITING SERVICE LOYAL STATES:

Recruits will be credited to the localities from which they received local bounties, provided the muster-in rolls show them enlisted and mustered in as of the said localities. The muster-in rolls must show the facts of the case, and will be the evidence for awarding the credits. Veterans in service re-enlisting will be credited to the localities to which the re-enlistments and muster-in rolls shows them as belonging. Therefore, until veterans have been remustered, it cannot be determined to what particular locality they will be credited. The foregoing is in answer to many inquiries received by the Department.

Furnish the Governor with a copy of this.

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 6, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel JAMES OAKES,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, Springfield, Ill.:

Try and correct the misapprehension arising from General Fuller's speech and try and keep up the recruiting spirit. Many men are yet wanted from the State. Congress will, in all probability, allow the large bounties to continue for a month or so longer.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

BOSTON, January 6, 1864.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

President Lincoln's message and your letter on recruiting eminently right. Work going on bravely in Massachusetts. We want thirty