War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 0008 CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.

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28. Incontinence of urine is not, of itself, a cause for exemption. Stone in the blader, ascertained by the introduction of the metallic catheter, is a positive disqualification.

29. Confirmed or malignant sarcocele; hydrocele, if complicated with organic disease of the testicle. Varicocele is not in itself disqualifying.

30. Loss of a hand or foot.

31. Wounds which would manifestly incapacitate the man for military service; muscular or cutaneous contractions from wounds or burns, or tumors, which would prevent marching, or otherwise manifestly incapacitate the man for military service.

32. Fractures, irreducible dislocations or anchylosis of the large joints, or chronic diseases of the joints or bones, that would prevent marching, or otherwise unfit the man for military service.

33. Total loss of right thumb; loss of ungual phalanx of right thumb; total loss of any two fingers of same hand; loss of the first and second phalanges of the fingers of right hand. Permanent extension or permanent contraction of two fingers of right hand; all the fingers adherent or united.

34. Club feet; total loss of a great toe. Other permanent defects or deformities of the feet, such as will necessarily prevent marching.

35. Varicose veins of inferior extremities, if large and numerous, and accompanied with chronic swellings or ulcerations.

36. Chronsive, deep, and ces of lower extremities.

Surgeons of boards of enrollment, in reporting "the statistic of the causes of exemption on account of physical disability," will hereafter, in addition to the alphabetical list of disabilities required by Circular No. 90, from this office, report the number rejected under each paragraph of the above list of disqualifying infirmities, and also the number for each distinct infirmity in the different paragraphs.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, January 5, 1864.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Recruiting for the old regiments is going on better than at any former time. Must it stop to-day?

O. P. MORTON.

WAR DEPARTMENT ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 5, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF IOWA,

Davenport, Iowa:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a memoranda in reference to the quotas of 1861, in answer to a portion of your letter of October 17, 1863, in which you ask information concerning those for the State of Iowa. The answer is the same as given to the other States where like information was asked for by them. Your letter of October 17 was received here during my absence from the Department; in consequence it was not until a day or two since that my attention was directed to your particular inquiry about the quotas. Therefore the delay in answering.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

THOMAS M. VINCENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

MEMORANDA.-In organizing troops in 1861, after the call of May 2, no formal assignments of quotas to States were made, and there