War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 1196 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., December 28, 1863.

His Excellency JOHN A. ANDREW,

Boston, Mass.:

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to inform you that all men enlisted in volunteer organizations from Massachusetts for the unexpired term of service of the regiment, pursuant to his telegram of July 21, 1862, will be mustered out of service and discharged with the regiments to which they belong. It is of course unnecessary to add that this rule is not now in force.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL BRECK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., December 28, 1863.

His Excellency GOVERNOR OF RHODE ISLAND,

Providence, R. I.:

SIR: I have respectfully to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of December 21, 1863, asking that you be authorized to raise a regiment of colored cavalry, and in reply thereto am directed to inform you that your request cannot be granted. It is thought that the interests of the service would not be promoted by a compliance with your request.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

C. W. FOSTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[DECEMBER 28, 1863.-For Hurlbut to Grant in relation in impressment of citizens into the military service, see Series I, Vol. XXXI, Part III, p. 522.]

INDIANAPOLIS, December 30, 1863.

Colonel JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

Advices from the Army of the Cumberland show that, owing to delays and difficulties in mustering and furloughing, its spirit of re-enlistment among the men is fast dying out. The men know that after field operations shall have opened in the spring they cannot be spared, and are becoming satisfied they will not be furloughed this winter. I fear the golden opportunity of re- enlisting the army, growing out of their desire to return home, will be lost. The commanding officers in the field have had armies furnished to them and know but little of the difficulties in creating them.

My apology for troubling you with this is the great anxiety I feel on the subject.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, December 30, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF KENTUCKY,

Frankfort, Ky.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 21st instant requesting information whether the emergency men