War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 1190 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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statement of the aggregate of each regiment in each branch of the service organized by me since the 1st of April, 1863:

Regiments or Aggregate Regiments or Aggregate

companies. strength. companies. strength.

1st Mississippi 425 9th Louisiana 1,010

Cavalry. Infantry.

1st Louisiana 400 10th Louisiana 797

Cavalry. Infantry.

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11th Louisiana 542

Infantry.

Total cavalry. 825 12th Louisiana 559

Infantry.

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1st Tennessee 747

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Infantry.

1st Tennessee Heavy 1,153 2nd Tennessee 820

Artillery. Infantry.

2nd Tennessee Heavy 878 1st Iowa Infantry. 965

Artillery.

1st Mississippi 644 1st Mississippi 440

Heavy Artillery. Infantry.

2nd Mississippi 1,008 2nd Mississippi 568

Heavy Artillery. Infantry.

1st Alabama Heavy 469 3rd Mississippi 599

Artillery. Infantry.

1st, 2nd, and 3rd 266 4th Mississippi 175

Louisiana Infantry

Batteries. (organizing).

Memphis Light 99 6th Mississippi 760

Battery. Infantry.

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1st Alabama 943

Infantry.

Total artillery. 4,517 2nd Alabama 960

Infantry.

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1st Missouri 985

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Infantry.

1st Arkansas 647 2nd Missouri 475

Infantry. Infantry.

2nd Arkansas 579 Liberia Guards 96

Infantry. (infantry).

3rd Arkansas 812

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Infantry.

4th Arkansas 310 Total infantry. 15,488

Infantry.

7th Louisiana 1,000

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Infantry.

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8th Louisiana 699 Grand total. 20,830

Infantry.

The above exhibits the exact strength of the regiments as shown in the last returns of the same, and shows a deficit of several thousand from the numbers originally organized. Probably 5,000 who belonged to the above regiments have either died of disease, been captured by the enemy, or have become lost to the service by other casualties. Several thousand have had to be rejected before muster on account of disease and malformation. The number of desertions have been few.

The majority of the freedmen manifest a partiality for the military service, and are undoubtedly happy and contended in their position in the Army. In estimating the number of colored troops organized at different points in the South and Southwest, it must be taken into consideration that I have had great difficulties to contend with, more especially from the fact that whenever it has been practicable the rebels have run off the slaves to Texas, Georgia, and other points at present beyond our reach. The statement given above of the troops raised does not include those mustered into service in the Department of the Gulf, numbering, probably, from 15,000 to 17,000, all of whom were organized under the direction of Major-Generals Banks and Butler. Neither does it include those raised by Major Stearns in East Tennessee. Of these it is understood there are two full regiments and two others in course of organization. I expect very soon to proceed to Nashville and points covered by Major-General Grant's army and give my personal attention to the organization of colored troops in that section of the country. It is to be presumed that as our armies advance the number of our colored organizations will be largely increased.

The sanitary condition of the colored troops has materially improved of late. As far as practicable all the men have been comfortably quartered in log huts, and in many instances in comfortable buildings. Every care has been taken to render them efficient as soldiers, and with success. In nearly every instance the officers appointed over them have been found capable of filling their positions with