War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 1139 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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throw of the rebellion, and the restoration, of peace and the establishment of the Union on a sure foundation in all the bounds of the United States.

Respectfully submitted.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, December 5, 1863

Ordered:

That Honorable William F. Allen, of New York; General John Love, of Indiana, and Chauncey Smith, esq., of Massachusetts be, and they are hereby, appointed, a special commission to revise the enrollment and quotas of the city and State of New York, and report whether there be any, and what, errors or irregularities, therein, and what corrections, if any, should be made. The commission to organize in the city of New York as speedily as possible. They may appoint a clerk at reasonable compensation. The Provost-Marshal-General will assign them suitable quarters for transacting their business and furnish them with a messenger and all necessary facilities.

He will cause the enrollment lists to be submitted to them, and furnish them with such information as they may require. The commissioners will report from time to time as the investigation proceeds so as not to delay the draft. They will receive by way of compensation $8 pr diem each while actually employed and their necessary traveling expenses, to be paid out of the fund in charge of the Provost-Marshal-General who will immediately communicate this order to the commissioners and report their acceptance or refusal of the appointment.

The commissioners will apply to the Department for further instructions if required.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Numbers 46.

Fort Monroe, Va., December 5, 1863.

The recruitment of colored troops has become the settled purpose of the Government. It is therefore the duty of every officer and soldier to aid in carrying out that purpose by every proper means, irrespective of personal predilection. To do this effectually the former condition of the blacks, their change of relation, the new rights acquired by the, the new obligations imposed upon them, the duty of the Government to them, the great stake they have in the war, and the claims their ignorance, and the helplessness of their women and children make upon each of us who hold a higher grade in social and political life, must all be carefully considered.

It will also be taken into account that the colored soldiers have none of the machinery of 'State aid" for the support of their families while fighting our battles, so liberally provided for the white soldiers, nor the generous bounties given by the State and National Governments in the loyal States, although this last is far more than compensated to the black man by the great boon awarded to him, the result of the war-freedom for himself and his race forever!