War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 1134 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Gunpowder............................. pounds........ 5,764,769

Accouterments for men.................sets.......... 919,676

Equipments for cavalry horses..........do............ 94,639

Artillery harness,each set for two horses...do....... 3,281

An immense amount of material has been prepared at the different arsenals, and work in metals, wood, and leather, in large quantity, is advanced toward completion, for the manufacture and repairs of all the various machines and implements of war in sue in the service.

The quantities of the principal articles of ordnance materials in the control of the Department at the beginning of the war, the quantities of those articles that have since been procured, and the quantities of those articles on hand on June 30, 1863, are shown in the following table, viz;

Names of articles. On hand at Procured since

beginning of war. war began.

Siege of sea-coast 1,052 1,064

artillery

Field artillery 231 2,734

Firearms for infantry 437,433 1,950,144

Firearms for cavalry 31,268 338,128

Sabers 16,933 337,555

Cannon-halls and 363,591 2,562,744

shells

Lead and lead 1,301,766 71,776,774

bullets.....pounds....

Cartridges for 28,248 2,738,746

artillery

Cartridges for small- 8,292,300 552,204,816

arms

Percussion-caps 19,808,000 769,475,000

Friction-primers 83,425 7,004,709

Gunpowder....pounds... 1,110,584 13,424,363

Saltpeper.... do..... 2,923,348 5,231,731

Accouterments for 10,930 1,831,300

infantry

Accouterments for 4,320 194,466

cavalry horses

Equipments for cavalry 574 216,658

horses

Artillery harness 586 18,666

(double)

Names of articles. Issued since war On hand for issue

began. June 30, 1863.

Siege of sea-coast 2,088 928

artillery

Field artillery 2,481 484

Firearms for infantry 1,551,576 836,001

Firearms for cavalry 327,170 42,226

Sabers 271,817 82,671

Cannon-halls and 1,745,586 1, 180,749

shells

Lead and lead 50,054,515 23,024,025

bullets.....pounds....

Cartridges for 2,274,490 492,504

artillery

Cartridges for small- 378,584,104 151,913,012

arms

Percussion-caps 715,036,470 74,246,530

Friction-primers 6,082,505 1,005,629

Gunpowder....pounds... 13,071,073 1,463,874

Saltpeper.... do..... None. 8,155,079

Accouterments for 1,680,220 162,010

infantry

Accouterments for 196,298 2,498

cavalry horses

Equipments for cavalry 211,670 5,562

horses

Artillery harness 17,485 1,767

(double)

The resources of this country for the production of arms and munitions of war have only commenced their developments, yet their extent may be inferred from the enormous quantities of supplies shown by the foregoing tabular abstract to have been furnished furing the last two years. At the beginning of the war we were compelled to rely upon foreign countries for the supply of nearly all our arms and munitions. Now all these things are manufacture at home, and we are independent of foreign countries not only for the manufactures, but also for the materials of which they are composed.

The excellence of arms and munitions of American manufacture which have been supplied by the Ordnance Department to the Army has been so obvious that our soldiers are no longer willing to use those which have been imported from other countries.

The efforts made during the war to extend and improve the manufacture of arms and munitions have resulted in discoveries of great importance to the country in peace as well as in war. Among the arts thus improved is the manufacture of wrought-iron, now rivaling the finest qualities of the iron of Sweden, Norway, and England, so highly in the arts.

This country until the present year has relied upon those countries for material to make gun-barrels, bridle bits, car- wheel tires, and other articles requiring iron of fines quality. The iron of our own production is now superior to that obtained abroad for all these purposes.