War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 1082 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. November 20, 1863.

The following "Instructions for making muster-rolls, for mustering into service, for periodical payments, and for discharge from service, of volunteers or militia," having been duly examined, are approved, and will be carried into effect.*

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

ROOMS OF THE NEW YORK ASSOCIATION FOR COLORED VOLUNTEERS, 32 Pine Street, New York, November 20, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: At a meeting of the general committee of the New York Association for Colored Volunteers, an association formed under the annexed call from Peter Cooper, General Sickles, and many other well-known citizens, it was--

Resolved, That General W. K. Strong, late of the U. S. Army, be requested to telegraph to the War Department to know whether the President will authorize the enlistment of colored volunteers in this State and credit them on the quota of this State, under the President's proclamation for more volunteers in suppressing the rebellion.

This application to the National Government results from the refusal of certain State functionaries to recognize colored men in the call for volunteers, notwithstanding the fact that the President's proclamation for volunteers makes no discrimination, and the additional fact that that class of citizens are subject (like white men) to a draft.

The brevity of the time left for action on this subject, and an earnest practicable moment, will probably furnish apology for this general committee in asking an early answer to the foregoing interrogatory.

By order of the general committee of the New York Association for Colored Volunteers.

HENRY O"RIELLY,

Secretary.

NEW YORK, November 9, 1863.

FELLOW-CITIZENS: New York State has but a few weeks within which to raise her quota of over 100,000 men by volunteering.

If we allow our citizens to be drawn away by superior inducements offered by other States, we lose them in making up our quota, and the draft will fall heavily upon those who are left.

Or, if we raise the men by volunteering at the last hour we shall have to pay large bounties and heavier taxes.

Let us move in this matter without delay. Other States are fast taking our men to fill their quotas; especially our colored men. Several thousands of these may be added to the strength or our Army, and also saved to the quota of our State by a prompt and vigorous movement. Our country's interest and self-interest here unite.

All who are in favor of supporting the Government and preserving the interests and honor of our State are invited to attend a prelim-

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*Instructions omitted.

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