War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0916 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, October 23, 1863.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

Your dispatch received. Our accounts stand as follows:

Calls for 1861.................................. 67,365

Calls of 1862................................... 36,858

Calls of 1862, nine-months" men, pro rata....... 9,217

Calls of 1863................................... 36,858

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Total........................................... 150,298

Contral credit: Furnished to June 10, 1863, 137,505.

Corrections: See Adjutant-General's letter, September 7, 1863, 4,361 men mustered after June 10, 1863. See my report of October 19, 1863, 5,952, leaving due September 30, 1863, 2,480.

Since that date there has been recruited, for Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, 338; for Twelfth Cavalry, 1,133; for the colored regiments, 91; recruits for old regiments up to September 1, 1863, 465, leaving but 453.

This number is more than made good by recruits for old regiments from September 1 to this date. I therefore claim that Ohio is exempt from draft.

I have submitted all exhibits to Colonel Parrott and have requested him to communicate with you on the subject.

D. TOD,

Governor of Ohio.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, October 23, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

Governor Tod has shown me the account of men due from Ohio, made up from statement of the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, dated June 10, and his correspondence on the subject. If the figures furnished from the Department June 10 are correct, the State has furnished her full quota. I communicate at the Governor's request.

E. A. PARROTT,

Colonel and Actg. Asst. Prov. March General Ohio.

NATCHEZ, MISS., October 24, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I came to this place the 14th instant to examine into the condition of the freed negroes, see to the organization of the able-bodied men, and give such orders as might be necessary for their well-being. I had finished my business in this respect, and contemplated returning up the river, when the generals in authority desired me to remain a week longer, as my presence they said was producing beneficial effects upon the citizens. I accordingly determined to remain a few days longer. The town of Natchez and Adams County, in which it is situated, has always been strongly Whig in its politics and gave a strong vote against secession, and I find here quite a Union feeling. Years ago I was stationed at this place, and I find several of my old friends who are Union men, men who have been so from the beginning.