War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0807 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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At the same time he sent the following:

(Numbers 3.) CONCORD, N. H., July 10, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

I have this day sent you by mail a copy of an act passed by our Legislature to which I wish to cal your immediate attention and reply.

J. A. GILMORE,

Governor.

And on the next day four of our members of Congress joined with His Excellency in again endeavoring to impress upon the Government the importance of the subject by means of the following communication:

(Numbers 4.) CONCORD, H. N. July 11, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

It is if the highest importance that the draft in New Hampshire should be made by townships and not by district, and that the several should have credit for soldiers sent by them the burden may be equalized-some towns having furnished their full proportion and others very few.

If the Department will allow our State authorities to assign quotas to the towns in making up the number from the districts the matter can be made satisfactory. We refer to papers forwarded the Department by Governor Gilmore and Major Mack.

J. A. GILMORE.

JOHN P. HALE.

DANIEL CLARK.

E. H. ROLLINS.

J. W. PATTERSON.

The Secretary of War immediately acknowledged the receipt of the two preceding telegrams, as follows:

(Numbers 5.) WASHINGTON, July 11, 1863.

His Excellency Governor GILMORE:

Your telegrams of yesterday and to-day have been received, and the subject will receive prompt attention on the receipt of the papers and act of Assembly referred to which have not yet reached here.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

Now, although the papers and the act of Assembly had not reached the War Department at this date, yet the Secretary had undoubtedly read and considered the telegram from the Governor and members of Congress (Numbers 4), in which the whole subject is treated, although very briefly, yet so clearly that the general object and purport of the act and of the "papers" could not have been misunderstood; and it is observable that the Secretary makes no intimation of any difficulty concerning the adjustment of the matter in the desired.

But after the lapse of three days, having heard heard nothing further from the War Department, the Governor, in order that no effort might