War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0798 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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to destroy the republican institutions of Mexico I believe there will be a resistance as universal and as persevering throughout the Mexican Republic as there was in Spain to the invasion and transfer of that monarchy by the first Napoleon to one of his own household. Such, I have from high authority, is the feeling throughout every class of people in Mexico, except the clergy, and even they are greatly divided on this time we have agents from the city of Chihuahua among us authorized to purchase arms and ammunition for the use of that State, in order to enable her to send the quota of troops armed and equipped, which has been called for, to the theater of war. Of arms there are none for sale in the Territory. A few kegs of powder may be bought in open market, but nothing that would approximate to the necessities of that State in the present emergency. The whole country seems to be destitute of the necessaries of war, and arms and powder are particularly scarce and not to be obtained. The great number of arms that were either surrendered or destroyed at the taking of Puebla would seem to have paralyzed the means and energies of the Mexican army, and if they are not assisted with these means of defense from some quarter, I fear they will fall an easy prey to the French Emperor. The States of Chihuahua and Sonora have been, and are now, anxious to be incorporated into the Government of the United States. Without suggesting the propierty or policy of any such measures at this time, I would say that there is no part of Mexico that would be of more importance to our country at the present and all future time than these two States. I have lived in Chihuahua twenty years, and know all that Sonora presents of interest. Her long line of coast upon the Gulf of California and the valuable ports of entry contained within that space would be of great value to our Government, and of incalculable injury if in the possession of a foreign and powerful maritime nation. A treaty for and purchase of this time might save much difficulty and embarrassment hereafter.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY CONNELLY,

Governor of New Mexico.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, September 14, 1863.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

It is unfortunate that the time fixed for the draft is just as our elections are taking place. Political excitement runs high in Ohio, and this will necessarily to some extent interfere with that qo essentially necessary for the marshals in the execution of their duty. I do not anticipate any collision, however; but if the draft could be postponed without prejudice to the public interest I advise that it be done.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, September 14, 1863.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

Men are offering hourly to enlist under the order for veteran volunteers. Please send me the instructions promised in Order 191.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.