War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0787 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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A mustering officer will be ordered to report to him for duty.

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By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

H. M. CIST,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, September 11, 1863.

GOVERNOR OF IOWA,

Davenport, Iowa:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant in reference to the value given nine-months" men in determining the excess of troops furnished by your State. In reply I am directed to inform you that one three-years" volunteers is considered equivalent to four nine-months"; 10,570 nine-months" men would therefore, be considered, equivalent to 2,642 three-years". This number deducted from 16,539 the excess of three-years", would leave 13,897 men of that class in excess of all calls.

I am, sir, &c.,

THOMAS M. VINCENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., September 11, 1863.

Major General N. P. BANKS,

Commanding Department of the Gulf, New Orleans:

GENERAL: Brigadier-General Ullmann represented to me a few days since that he desired to raise a regiment of colored troops, the officers of which, or some of them, were to be of African descent. To this I objected, for many obvious reasons.

I understand that he has requested you to authorize such an organization, and believing it to be highly injurious to the organizations already organized with entirely white officers, I respectfully request that you will withhold your recommendation.

As General Ullmann has asked for an organization with negro officers after my express disapprobation, I request that he may not be authorized to organize any troops whatever.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

BALTIMORE, September 11, 1863.

Hon. M. BLAIR:

MY DEAR JUDGE: Whilst the progress of our Army everywhere just now is calculated to fill us with joy and hope, I cannot enjoy it as I would like, witnessing as I do the excitement and alarm existing here from what may almost be called the kidnaping of our slaves. It sometimes really almost seems that there is a determination somewhere to get up if possible something of a civil war in Maryland, just as we are about to subdue it everywhere else. I went to Washington two weeks ago on this subject and regretted that you were