War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0755 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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THREE YEARS-Continued.

Arm of service. Infantry. Cavalry. Artillery. Hoffman

Battalion.

1862.

888 --- --- ---

116th Regiment

117th Regiment 765 --- --- ---

118th Regiment 817 --- --- ---

119th Regiment 129 --- --- ---

120th Regiment 946 --- --- ---

121st Regiment 939 --- --- ---

122nd Regiment 933 --- --- ---

123rd Regiment 942 --- --- ---

124th Regiment 919 --- --- ---

125th Regiment 762 --- --- ---

126th Regiment 879 --- --- ---

Trumbull Guards --- --- --- ---

2 companies --- --- --- ---

sharpshooters

7th Regiment --- 1,174 --- ---

8th Regiment --- 309 --- ---

9th Regiment --- 430 --- ---

10th Regiment --- 806 --- ---

8 batteries --- --- 1,142 ---

1 company --- 81 --- ---

Total --- --- --- ---

Arm of service. Dennison Trumbull Sharpshoot Total.

Guards. Guards. ers.

1862.

--- --- --- ---

116th Regiment

117th Regiment --- --- --- ---

118th Regiment --- --- --- ---

119th Regiment --- --- --- ---

120th Regiment --- --- --- ---

121st Regiment --- --- --- ---

122nd Regiment --- --- --- ---

123rd Regiment --- --- --- ---

124th Regiment --- --- --- ---

125th Regiment --- --- --- ---

126th Regiment --- --- --- 37,813

Trumbull Guards --- 93 --- 93

2 companies --- --- 183 183

sharpshooters

7th Regiment --- --- --- ---

8th Regiment --- --- --- ---

9th Regiment --- --- --- ---

10th Regiment --- --- --- 2,719

8 batteries --- --- --- 1,142

1 company --- --- --- 81

Total --- --- --- 121,622

THOMAS M. VINCENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, June 10, 1863.

NEW YORK, September 1, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK:

MY DEAR SIR: The course of Governor Seymour ought to be more thoroughly canvassed and exposed than it has been. I will see that it is done if I can get the materials. His friends say that he could have got all the men by volunteering that were needed. I understand-

First. That in eight months, since his administration commenced, he has sent only 2,000 men into the field.

Second. That he promised in May to reorganize the thirty-eight two-years" regiments in thirty days, if they could be allowed to come here and be mustered out.

Third. That he asked an extension of thirty days. This I learn from General Canby. It is well known that the only one of these regiments saved is the Third (now on Morris Island), which was reorganized by me at Fort Monroe.

Fourth. Colonel Fry told me he had written Governor Seymour early in regard to the draft, and asked his advice, but received no answer. I think he said he had written more than once.

Will you send me the facts, correspondence, &c? I will in that case bring them out.

Seymour was elected on the platform of a "more vigorous prosecution of the war." He has practicably put himself on the platform of his relative and namesake in Connecticut- "A vigorous prosecution of peace."

I have found in the annals of Congress some interesting facts.

When Madison and Monroe proposed a draft it was attacked by the Federalists in Congress. Among others Morris S. Miller, of Utica, with whose family Seymour is connected (I think by a double