War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0722 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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OFFICE OF COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., August 26, 1863.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Commanding Dept. of the Cumberland, Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

The Secretary of War directs that hereafter no prisoners of war be enlisted in our Army without his special sanction in each case.

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Same to Generals Dix, Morris, and Schofield.

STATE OF INDIANA, OFFICE ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Indianapolis, August 26, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

SIR: I have the honor to herewith transmit a copy of a report of Captain James Park, provost-marshal, Eighth District of Indiana, relative to mob violence at Danville, Ill., and the military aid sent by Captain Park from this State. I have written to Captain Park, approving his action in the premises.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CONRAD BAKER,

Colonel and Actg. Asst. Prov. March General for Indiana.

[Inclosure.]

OFFICE PROV. March, EIGHTH DISTRICT, STATE OF INDIANA,

La Fayette, Ind., August 25, 1863.

COLONEL: Last evening (24th) about 7 o"clock I received the following dispatch:

DANVILLE, ILL., August 24.

PROVOST-MARSHAL LA FAYETTE:

Mob violence is raging here. Three of our citizens have been killed, many wounded, Can you send fifty armed soldiers by the 10 o"clock train to-night?

FITHIAN,

Captain and Provost-marshal.

In addition to this word was brought on the evening train that the provost-marshal at danville and his office was in great danger. Having no time to send word to you, and it being dark, I acted on my own judgment. I called upon the colonel of the One hundred and fourth Regiment for 100 picked men and forty rounds of ammunition. The call was immediately filled and the men ready. The abash and Toledo Railroad Company furnished me with a special train, and we started at half-past 9. We reached Danville before 1 clock this morning, met the provost-marshal, and tendered the 100 soldiers under the command of Captain Dutch to the marshal. The soldiers were quartered at a safe and convenient place by the provost-marshal's office. There was much excitement, five persons then dead and more dangerously wounded, a large number, said to be 400 men, armed, close to the town, threatening to destroy the town and have revenge on the marshal unless he should obey their demands. I left Danville this morning at half-past 5 and arrived at headquarters by 7, being absent only about ten hours during the night. I left the men at Danville under the control of the marshal. They will probably return