War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0685 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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days to arrange my affairs here and in Boston, but as soon as possible I will report myself for duty according to orders.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE L. STEARNS,

Major and A. A. G., U. S. Vols., Recruiting Comr. U. S. Colonel Vols.

STATE OF ILLINOIS, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Springfield, August 17, 1863..

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I am satisfied there will be formidable organized resistance to the draft in many parts of this State. I am further satisfied that whether there is a draft or not there is a settled purpose of revolution in the State.

Large bodies of men meet in arms in various parts of the State, in some cases 400 or 500 armed men, and applaud speakers who advise them to arm and resist the oppression of the Government. Companies and battalions drill by day and night, threatening opposition to the Government. An outbreak may be expected at any time. Murders and assassinations continually occur.

Our State is defenseless. You do not reply to my appeals for troops and arms. You have not answered my letter of August 5.

I will again appeal to you either to send arms for the militia companies now being organized, or to send an independent force of five or six regiments to General Ammen here, or what would perhaps be the best course, send seven or eight of our old regiments to the State to recruit.

I beseech you to consider this carefully and to act immediately.

Very respectfully,

RICHARD YATES,

Governor.

HARRISBURG, August 17, 1863.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General U. S. Army:

Governor Curting gives me official information that the State troops will be withdrawn and mustered out of service at once. There are less than 300 of Invalid Corps here. How shall troops be placed at Pottsville and other places?

J. V. BOMFORD,

Lieutenant Colonel Sixteenth U. S. Infty., Actg. Asst. Prov. March General

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y., August 18, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I am advised by the quartermaster at Fort Monroe that only two steamers with troops for this city had arrived at 2 p. m. to-day. They cannot possibly be here before to-morrow night, if then. I shall try to keep the knowledge of the fact concealed and make the most of the force we have. Heavy any transports come direct without stopping