War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0672 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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forcible resistance to it. I will write the Secretary of War fully by to-day's mail.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., August 12, 1863.

Major-General DIX,

Commanding, New York City:

I sent to Colonel Nugent to-day orders for draft and directed him to cal on you with them. The Secretary of War orders the drawing to commence in the city on Wednesday next, the 19th instant, without fail. A large force than you have represented as necessary will be at your disposal in New York before that day.

J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., August 12, 1863.

Colonel ROBERT NUGENT,

Actg. Asst. Provost-Marshal-General, New York City:

I mailed orders for draft to-day. Call in person on General Dix in reference to the matter to-morrow, and again when you receive the order, and let there be no misunderstanding or mistake on your part. The drawing must commence on Wednesday next, the 19th instant, without fail.

J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST,

New York City, August 12, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I telegraphed the Provost-Marshal-General this morning that there ought to be 10,000 troops in this city and harbor when the draft is resumed, and that with such a force if may be commenced on Monday. This force is the smallest estimated by any one as necessary to hold the forts, provide for the safety of the public property in the city, and overawe resistance to the draft. Although General Canby has 5,000 men, they are very much scattered, and not more than 2,000 would be available for service in the city.

The interests the Government has in the city, independently of the importance of preventing any open opposition to its authority, are too great to be put at hazard by want of adequate preparation, and I am constrained to believe that the whole moral influence of the executive power of the State will be thrown against the execution of the law for enrolling and calling out the national forces, and a case may occur into which the military power of the State will be employed to defeat it. If this case arises, or is like to arise, I shall promptly declare martial law and suspend the civil authority. In connection with the subject it becomes of the greatest importance to consider the extent of the President's authority over the militia of this city and State.