War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0665 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, August 10, 1863.

Major A. S. DIVEN,

Actg. Asst. Provost-Marshal-General, Elmira, N. Y.:

Is the draft going on in Onondaga County? It is reported to have been suspended. It must be carried out at once. Please answer.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

ELMIRA, August 10, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY:

The draft has not been suspended in Onondaga County. I directed it to commence on the 2nd instant and again on the 5th. It has not commenced as yet. What the provost-marshal of the Twenty- third District means I cannot tell.

A. S. DIVEN,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST,

New York City, August 10, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

COLONEL: You no doubt hear regularly from Majors Diven and Townsend and know all they are doing. In the districts under the superintendence of the former the draft is expected to be completed by the middle of this week. Major Townsend is going on with his districts. He was apprehensive that there would be difficulty at Oswego, and I sent a small body of troops there. Everything passed off well. He requested permission to take the same troops to Oneida the next day, and it was granted. Hearing nothing from him, I resume the draft was completed there without opposition. On Saturday there was a prospect of disturbance at Schenectady, and I sent day 200 men there. I learn there was no resistance. In the river districts troops will be needed, and I have not enough to spare for more than one at a time.

In the Albany and Ulster districts I think artillery as well as infantry will be needed, and the draft must be a few days apart.

In this city there must be some preparation. With 800,000 people there are many villains, and beside the secession and anti-draft interests, the plunderers will try to create confusion. I am now concerting a system of preparation which I hope will prevent disturbance. I have asked the Governor whether I can rely on his co-operations with the military power of the State. He has not answered.

The President's letter to him, which I have seen this morning, is admirable, and I do not see how he can avoid giving an affirmative answer to my inquiry.

I think the city districts should be the last to be drafted, and that the further delay need not be great. I will communicate with the War Department in a few days.

I am, respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.