War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0561 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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B.

ODIN, July 22, 1863.

Colonel OAKES:

Have you sent any men to Olney? I had to make my escape with rolls to Saint Louis. Dispatch me at Planters" House, Saint Louis, to-night, if possible. Will be up on noon train from Saint Louis to-morrow.

W. B. ARCHER.

ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Elmira, N. Y., July 23, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

DEAR SIR: I have just returned from a visit to all the headquarters of provost-marshals in my division of the State. I wrote you yesterday in haste and with imperfect accommodations for writing. I have been very careful to confer with the civil authorities of towns and counties in which headquarters are situated. I would feel perfectly safe to complete the draft next week if I had at my disposal 1,000 stand of arms, and I do not believe it would be necessary to unpack any of them; still they should be where they could be made available.

The worms element of disturbance now is the persistent attempt of our Republican friends to make the Democratic party and rioters identical. Even if this were true, no policy could be worse than to make it apparent to the brutal wretches who take part in the riots. What stronger encouragement could they have than to believe they were backed by so powerful an organization, and how many simpleminded men throughout the country, who think the Democratic party infallible, will believe there must be a justification for these riots if their party encourage them? There is also danger od exasperating many a man by this course until he is driven from the support of the Government, who would otherwise be loyal.

While it is true that all or nearly all the opposition to the draft comes from democrats, it is also true that in my arrangements for enforcing the law I have received the most efficient aid from Democrats.

The most successful objection by the enemies of the draft is that the Army might have been recruited by volunteers. How would it do to order that the drafted men of any sub-district supplying the quota by volunteers within thirty days should be discharged the service? This would take the wind out of their sails, and with proper regulations for return of bounty, clothing, &c., would work no injury. Anything better than stop the draft; that is, to have the government beaten by a mob.

I am, truly, your obedient servant,

A. S. DIVEN.

ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Elmira, N. Y., July 23, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General:

COLONEL: I understand the position of Governor Seymour in relation to the draft to be this: That any drafted man has a right to the writ of habeas corpus; that if the military authorities refuse to pro-

36 R R-SERIES III, VOL III