War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0553 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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appointed a guard in each village, as many as choose to organize- say 100 in each village of 600 voters-and that arms and ammunition be forthwith issued to each, and that they be kept in each man's house ready for use upon a moment's warning. I write this at the request of many of our leadingment in the State. Our State committee meets here to-morrow and the matter will be further discussed them. But no time should be lost. Major Townsend telegraphed the War Department, but has no answer.

Yours, &c.,

E. F. BULLARD,

Of Waterford.

[First indorsement.]

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Washington, D. C., July 31, 1863.

Respectfully referred to Major Frederick Townsend, acting assistant provost-marshal-general for Northern Division of New York at Albany.

By command of Colonel Fry, Provost-Marshal-General:

HENRY STONE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

OFFICE ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, NORTHERN DIVISION OF NEW YORK,

Albany, August 3, 1863.

Respectfully referred to Captain Butler, provost-marshal Eighteenth, for his views. Indorse same hereon and return to this office.

FREDK. TOWNSEND,

Major, U. S. Army, Actg. Asst. Provost-Marshal-General.

[Third indorsement.]

PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, 18TH DIST. OF NEW YORK,

Schenectady, August 4, 1863.

The within letter is substantially true in the relation of facts at the time it was written. The state of affairs is somewhat modified. It is my opinion, however, that previous to a draft in this district a force should be sent to these headquarters-say 200 men. If the draft should be opposed in any of the towns a force could be sent from hereto anticipate it. In the village of Saratoga Springs, now full of visitors, it would be necessary to have a guard when the notices are served and drafts enforced, as there is a dangerous element there. Threats have been made to burn the large hotels there if the draft is enforced there. If the draft is enforced first in New York City and Troy, where riots have existed, it would have the effect of quieting disloyalty throughout this district to a great extent and swarming opposition.

I think a small force as above stated would be ample under present circumstances.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

J. P. BUTLER,

Captain and Provost-Marshal, Eighteenth District of New York.