War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0548 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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wrong in their action. As you were instrumental in the appointment of some of the members, will you please, for the good of the service, at once look into their doings?

JAMES B. F RY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

(Same to Honorable H. B. Anthony, Honorable William Sprague, Honorable Thomas A. Jenks, Providence, R. I.)

CIRCULAR

WAR DEPT., PROV. March GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 54.

Washington, D. C., July 20, 1863.

Existing laws make a distinction in the matter of pay, bounty, nd other allowances between soldiers of American descent and other soldiers in the service of the United States. Men of African descent can, therefore, only be accepted as substitutes for each other under the enrollment act.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 20, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: It is plain from the signs of the times that the question of the constitutionality of the enrollment act will very soon be carried before certain State courts, and it is probable that decisions will be rendered adverse to the interest of the United States. In consideration of this fact and of the present condition of the public mind, as I see it by the public press and private correspondence, I think it would be best, if it can be properly done, to have the constitutionality of this law passed upon by the Supreme Court of the United States at once.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

STATE OF MINNESOTA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Paul, July 20,1 863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I desire to call your attention to the situation of the people of this State in relation to the enforcement of the "Act for enrolling and calling out the national forces, and for other purposes," approved March 3, 1863.

Our border counties are sparsely settled by farmers living in houses from half a mile to two miles, and often farther distant from each other, in families consisting generally of one man and his wife and children. This separation form each other, required by the custom of civilization that each family should have a home of its own and cultivate its own land, renders them an easy prey to the outrages of hostile Sioux Indians, who are now prowling through the country in small parties, and being able, like wild beasts, to subsist wherever are water, game, and plunder, can hunt in bands for offense or defense. This makes it necessary for the settlers to be constantly at home exercising the utmost watchfulness for themselves and families.