War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0541 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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in New York. The riot had unexpectedly assumed a character which they could not safely indorse, and they propose to stop it a quickly as possible and try again.

An armed revolution in New York has been resolved on by the rebel sympathizers almost from the commencement. Before the fall of Sumter, Fernando Wood, in a message to the Common Council, accounted that by the secession of South Carolina the Union was dissolved, and it becomes every city and every community to take care of itself, and suggested that New York become a free city, like Frankfort-on-the-Main.

A secret organization was set on foot for this purpose, and I was told by a Democrat now in the service of the Government that 5,000 names were pledged to the movement almost from the beginning.

This organization, as I believe, his been long perfected in the different wards, and a movement for the last 4th of July was averted by the news of national victories. The existing riots were not contemplated in the shape they took and have interfered with the original plan.

That plan, as I believe, form various suggestions let drop by newspapers and individuals, is this: To bring about a collision between the National Government and the government of the State of New York in such a shape that they can rely upon the co- operation of the entire Democracy of the North. The plan was shadowed forth in the Express, I think of yesterday, in connection with the enforcement of the draft, and the contemplated refusal of the Government to obey the mandate of the State courts, in which case Governor Seymour will be called on to maintain the right and dignity of the people of the State of New York as embodied in the decision of their judges, and it is understood that he will obey such a call with great alacrity, and then they hope for an ignominious surrender by the National Government, or, what would suit them a thousand times better, such a refusal to recognize the judiciary of New York as would result in an armed conflict between the National Government, or, what would suit them a thousand times better, such a refusal to recognize the judiciary of New York as would result in an armed conflict between the National Government and State government.

This is the last great card, I think, of the rebellion, and demands careful play on the part of the Government, so that, without any surrender of the rights and dignity of the Administration, the proposed collision shall be rendered impossible. The rebels in this city have from the first been entirely confident of their final success. I was told a year ago by one of the most wealthy and fashionable bankers of New York that this Administration would not be allowed to complete its term; that it would be overthrown by an armed revolt in said, sadly and solemnly, "I do not know when it will be done, nor how it will be done, but that it will e done I am as certain as that I stand here." This man has been assisting Governor Seymour to suppress these riots. He may hope next month to assist him to resist the President and the draft.

The minds of the Irish are inflamed to the point of absolute and brutal insanity. And apart from the Irish the copperhead element in the rural districts is ready to co-operate with them. In the usually quiet neighborhood where I live, in Westchester County, some forty miles from town, threatens of murder and arson are openly made. In what way the governments are to meet this intended and very serious