War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0531 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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The conjectures of the Government contained in the above, as to the postponement of the draft, were confirmed yesterday by the following note received from Assistant Provost-Marshal Nugent:

THE DRAFT.

NEW YORK, July 15, 1863.

The draft has been suspended in New York City and Brooklyn.

ROBERT NUGENT,

Colonel and Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

[Indorsement.]

He will have seen before this from Circular Numbers 48 that the thought of giving up the draft in New York has never been entertained for a moment.

H[ENRY] S[TONE].

PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, SIXTEENTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OF NEW YORK, Plattsburg, July 17, 1863.

Major FREDERICK TOWNSEND,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General:

SIR: I have seen in the newspapers a circular, purporting to be Numbers 44, from the Provost-Marshal-General's office, but have not yet received this circular. As it is regarded here as extremely unjust and calculated to make mischief, I have not yet acted upon it, preferring to wait until I get the circular officially. The questions referred to have been discussed by the most prominent lawyers of this part of the country, including Honorable Orlando Kellogg, M. C., Judge Beckwith, and others, whose loyalty cannot be doubted. Their opinion is that a man should be permitted to know that he is liable to a draft before the communication money or substitute is demanded. If this order, or Circular Numbers 44, is carried out, it will, in my opinion, disgust the true friends of the Administration and give the copperheads an opportunity of claiming popular sympathy. The majority, in fact almost all the drafted men that present themselves, are exempt. Those who will be held will not present themselves until the ten days have expired. There will then be a great number of persons in this town and means must be taken to preserve order. There are fifty muskets at the barracks, but no ammunition. Ammunition should be sent here immediately. No violence of a serious character has occurred in this district, except that in Glens Falls the enrolling officer has been unable to serve the notices to drafted men among the Irish population. Threats are made that my house will be burned, &c. Colonel Colvin, of the Thirty-first Regiment Militia, resides in Glens alls; he reports to be supplied with ammunition to enforce the draft among the men whom Governor Seymour is said to call, "his friends."

Of course, without a force is at my disposal capable of putting down opposition it will be a work of great difficulty.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE CLENDON, JR.,

Provost-Marshal, Sixteenth District of New York.