War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0510 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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guarding all points to take my life. I must have help, keep away from home, or lose of my life. Let me hear from you at once.

W. T. INGRAM,

Captain and Deputy Provost-Marshal, Franklin County, Ill.

OFFICE ACTG. ASST. PROV. March General FOR ILLINOIS, Springfield, July 15, 1863.

Captain W. T. INGRAM,

Deputy Provost-Marshal, Franklin County, Duquoin, Ill.:

I have no troops to spare to-night. You had better go to Carbondale, where you find troops to protect you. Telegraph me from there.

JAMES OAKES,

Lieutenant Colonel Fourth U. S. Cav. and A. A. P. M. G. for Illinois.

O.

PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, FIFTH DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS, Peoria, July 14, 1863.

Colonel JAMES OAKES,

Acting Assisntat Provost-Marshal-General, Springfield:

COLONEL: At several different periods heretofore I have taken the liberty of suggesting that prudence dictated some preparation for suppressing any attempt to resist the draft or the enrollment in this district. The citizens here claim a population of more than 15,000 in this city. The city government is in the hands of the Irish. Those men here on whom I rely for information say the officers of this city are entirely under the control of the worst calls of people in the city. The majority of the men are opposed to the draft. Not a policeman that would lift a finger to quell a riot. magistrates, judges, and all other officers h ere owe their elevation to office to the enemies of the Government. Of what use to call on the posse under such circumstances? This office should have a strong force to protect it from mob violence or be removed to some place where human being have control.

I am, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JA. M. ALLAN,

Captain and Provost-Marshal, Fifth District of Illinois.

P.

PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, FIFTH DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS, Peoria, July 14, 1863.

Colonel JAMES OAKES,

Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, Springfield:

COLONEL: Since writing the letter accompanying this three gentlemen, composing a committee appointed by a meeting of twenty of the most respectable citizens of this city, have been in to consult about the dangers which seem to threaten any attempt to draft. They will probably visit Springfield. They want arms.

One hundred well-drilled soldiers would be better than 500 citizens not drilled. The citizens here are evidently much alarmed.

I am, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. M. ALLAIN,

Captain and Provost-Marshal, Fifth District of Illinois.