War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0498 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Make every arrangement for their comfort in quarters and rations, and an necessary additional expense I will authorize.

Five companies leave here to-night to report to you.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., July 15, 1863-3.45 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel W. D. WHIPPLE,

Military Governor, Philadelphia:

Three companies of the Invalid Corps are ordered from Harrisburg to report to you. Make arrangements to have them comfortable provided for, and do not except long-continued exertion form them.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

PHILADELPHIA, PA., July 15, 1863.

Colonel J. B. FRY.,

Provost-Marshal-General:

I do not require any soldiers of the Invalid Corps. Will have sufficient others to-morrow. I cannot provide quarters for my provost guard, but am compelled to put them ion camp. Please countermand the order for the Invalid Corps.

WD. D. WHIPPLE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., July 15, 1863-10.30 p. m.

Colonel William D. WHIPPLE,

MiliTary Governor of Philadelphia:

Your telegraph received. The fire companies order from there have been retained here. If the companies of the Invalid Corps from Harrisburg arrive, camp them and provide for them as you best can.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

LANCASTER, July 15, 1863.

Honorable James B. fry,

Provost-marshal-General:

SIR: Permit me to doubt whether you have carefully considered the conscription law with respect to the effect of the draft. The law plainly, to my mind, places those who pay $300 and those who furnish a substitute on the same footing, and neither of them can be again drafted until the whole of the first and second classes are exhausted. It would be monstrous if men whoso religion does not allow them to bear alms and who pay the commutation, as the law says, "for the procuration of substitutes," should not be exempt the same way as if he served or paid a substitute himself; it would be persecuting him with liabilities equal to al the others, not simply equal to one other citizen. This is not and ought to be the law. It is said, also, after a drafted man has presented himself, and claims exemption