War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0496 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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I have therefore procured an order to be issued from the headquarters of this department, authorizing you to call for troops necessary to protect you and your subordinate officers in the discharge of your duties. I sent you a copy of that order on the 10th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. B. ALEXANDER,

Colonel and Actg. Asst. Prov. March General for Missouri.

TRENTON, N. J., July 15, 1863.

(received 10.40 a. m.)

Colonel J. B. fry,

Provost-Marshal-General:

There is much excitement in the State, and organizations are forming to resist the draft. I have no means of enforcing it, when ordered, at my disposal.

ROBERT C. BUCHANAN,

Lieutenant Colonel Fourth Infantry, Actg. Asst. Prov. March General

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., July 15, 1863-9. 10 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel R. C. BUCHANAN,

Actg. Asst, Prov. March General, Trenton, N. J.:

Direct the provost-marshals to be watchful and to inform themselves of all that is going on, but to perform their duties in as quiet and inoffensive a manner as possible, and not to do anything likely to brig on a disturbance, ever to yield a little, ap present, if necessary.

Troops have been sent to New York, and when the riot is quelled there will be available for New Jersey,m and all opposition will be put down.

The draft will not ordered in New Jersey until we are prepared to enforce it.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

WESTERN DIVISION, STATE OF NEW YORK,

Elmira, July 15, 1`863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the draft is progressing quietly in the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-sixth Districts; in the twenty-seventh it is almost half completed. I have not heard from the Twenty-six to-day further than that it was progressing.

In the Thirty-first no draft has a set been ordered; I think no difficulty need be apprehended there. In the Thirtieth there were mistakes in the allotments, and we are ostensibly delaying the draft until it can be ratified. In the Twenty-fifth there are some important errors in allotments and enrollments. The provost- marshal has telegraphed you for instructions and as soon as they are received will commence the draft. In the Twenty-eighth there are some errors to be corrected, making another occasion for delay. I am not sorry to have a cause that the public may know for delay in the two districts embracing cities.