War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0486 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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If, however, they should escape arrest, the burden of military duty may fall a little heavier upon the loyal and brave, but this voluntary exile of cowards or traitors will receive the country of a class of men it can well spare.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshall-General.

NEW YORK CITY, July 13, 1863-5.30 p. m.

(Received 7.40 p. m.)

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

It would I think be well to give such public information regarding the draft as to who that it was perfectly fair, and that each locality was called upon by the Government only for its just proportion. This would have a good influence on matters in New York. I would also suggest the property of having it understood that camps of instruction, certainly in each of the large and perhaps in all the State, were to be established,a n the men now drafted are to form for the present reserve corps. It is well to adopt all reasonable precaution.

E. D. MORGAN.

[JULY 13-16, 1863.-For reports and correspondence relating to draft riots in new york City, Troy, and Boston, see Service I, Vol. XXVII, Part II, p. 875 et seq.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, July 13, 1863.

His Excellency Governor TOD,

Columbus, Ohio:

The answer to your request for arms of the State militia has been delayed to get returns from all the arsenals, and an account of all the issues that have been made within a month to the different State. The number you desire-15,000-can be issued to you, and if those mentioned in your telegram as now being in the arsenal unfit for the field will suit your purpose, they will be immediately ordered to be delivered upon your requisition. They are of the same class issued to the militia of other States. This telegram may serve as authority for you to obtain, or a formal will be transmitted if your desire.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJ. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 216.

Washington, July 14, 1863.

I. All able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and forty- five years who have heretofore been enlisted and have served for not less than nine months, have been honorably discharged, and can pass the examination required by the mustering regulations of the United