War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0485 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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stated in general and suitable terms. The exact cause must in all cases be reported to this office.

J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

(Same to Major Townsend, New York; Major Diven, New York; Colonel Bomford, Pennsylvania; Major Perkins, Connecticut; Captain Dilvey, Rhode Island; Captain Dryer, Massachusetts; General Pitcher, Vermont; Major Mack, New Hampshire; captain Bailey, Maine.)

LOWEL, MASS., July 13, 1863.

(Received 1.10 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Much mischief is done by the publication of the names of drafted men in the newspapers in advance of the official notification. Drafts are evading without any liability to the penalties. Would suggest that no publication be permitted.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

BOSTON, July 13, 1863.

Colonel JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-marshal-general:

Drafted men are leaving the State in large numbers before there is time to serve on them. Can authority be given to prevent this by an order forbidding all persons liable to a draft to leave without pass from provost-marshal?

GEO. A. SHAW,

Captain and Provost-Marshal, Third District. of Massachusetts.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., July 13, 1863.

Captain GEORGE A. SHAW,

Provost-Marshal, Third Dist. of Massachusetts, Boston, Mass.:

CAPTAIN: I have received your telegram of this date, saying that in the Third District of Massachusetts men whose names have been drawn in the draft were fleeing from their homes before official notification can be served upon them, and recommending that orders be published requiring passes from provost-marshal before people can leave their abodes. I am happy to say the evil you companion od does not seem to be general, and for the mere purpose of meeting it I cannot recommend to the Government that any of the law-abiding people shall be controlled or incommoded in their movements. All men who absent themselves in the manner stated are forever to be deserters and it is the duty of all officers of the Army and of all good citizens, but especially of the officers and employes of this department, to arrest and turn them over for trial and punishment whenever an wherever they may be found. I have no doubt this duty will be faithfully performed, and with a view to it the deserters must be published and posted throughout the country.